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Planning a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Alaska? Lucky you! Even after growing up in Alaska (15 years) and visiting a half-dozen times since then, I’m always wistful when I hear of people headed to the place I once called home.

As you finalize your Alaska itinerary and pack your bags, make sure you leave some room: you’re going to want to bring home at least one souvenir! To help you plan ahead for how much space to leave in your suitcase, I’ve put together this list of the best Alaskan souvenirs out there. Don’t be surprised if you want to bring them all home!

1. Alaskan Salmon

Souvenirs from Alaska - Wild Alaskan Products Salmon

After growing up in Alaska, I was obviously quite spoiled for enjoying the freshest seafood out there. I therefore always recommend that while you’re in Alaska, you try the seafood. Whether you try fresh or smoked salmon, don’t be surprised if you get hooked and want to bring some home as the ultimate Alaskan souvenir.

If you’ve already come home from Alaska and developed a taste for Alaska salmon during your trip, never fear! Wild Alaskan Company offers a recurring delivery box of Alaskan fish – salmon or whitefish. If you click here, you can get $15 off your first box. Even better, they’re going to introduce a smoked salmon add-on to that box option soon!

2. Ulu

On my first trip to Alaska after Mr. V and I first started dating, I brought him an Ulu home as a gift. This knife is traditionally used by Inuit, Yupik, and Aleut women, which is what the word ‘ulu’ means (“women’s knife”). Nevertheless, it’s a cool souvenir for chefs because it’s such a unique piece they’ll want to use and display it.

Ulus are sometimes sold with a bowl or cutting board; if you plan to use it, I highly recommend buying them together. No matter what though, make sure you buy a display stand for you ulu so you can show it off.

Pro-tip: The Ulu Factory in Anchorage is the place to browse ulus.

3. Ivory Billiken

Alaskan Souvenirs - Billiken

This little guy is called a Billiken, and it helps to explain who he is before saying why this is one of the best Alaskan souvenirs you can bring home.

The Billiken was originally designed by an artist in St. Louis, but was adopted and integrated into Alaskan artwork by the mid-20th Century. Today you can find these figures carved from ivory in all of the major tourist stops. Generally speaking a Billiken is a good luck token – but it’s even better to receive one, so they’re an ideal gift for those who couldn’t join you on your Alaska bucket list trip.

4. Birch Syrup

Canada can keep their maple syrup, in Alaska we use birch syrup! Birch syrup, as you’d probably guess, is made in the same way as its maple sibling. Sugarmakers tap birch trees to collect and process the sap, then sell it for use in a variety of ways.

It tastes as delicious on morning pastries as it does on ice cream, and you can find it at some Alaskan souvenir shops and markets across the state. If you don’t want a whole bottle, opt for a sample size – you also won’t have any issues with TSA that way!

5. Gold!

Gold is a quintessential Alaskan souvenir, because it helped drive interest in the 49th State – and it comes in so many forms that you’ll find a great (albeit expensive) gift for everyone on your list.

The 1898 Gold Rush brought thousands of miners to Alaska in search of riches, and gold panning and mining continued through the 20th Century and to this day. Throughout Alaska, you can find small touristy gold panning experiences, where you can keep your findings. These are often little flakes, but bringing home a vial of them is a fun experiential and keepsake souvenir from Alaska.

6. Bear Claws

Alaska Souvenirs - Bear Claw Salad Tongs
Photo © Ironwood Gourmet

Everybody should eat more salads, and this Alaskan souvenir will help! Called “bear claws,” these salad tongs evoke one of the most fierce Alaskan predators. Typically you buy them with (or they come with) a matching wooden bowl so there’s no excuse for skipping your greens.

If you forgot to snag a pair on your trip, you can buy the ones pictured above here online.

7. Burl Bowls

Never heard of a burl? You’ll probably see them on some trees in Alaska while you’re there! These growths are actually damaging for the tree, and can affect the wood’s use after the tree falls or is felled. Luckily some artists cut these deformations off and use them to make one of the best Alaskan souvenirs!

Burl bowls are another beautiful gift for someone you love who spends a lot of time in the kitchen or serving guests. Many of the places that sell them can ship them directly home so you don’t have to worry about packing it.

8. Alaska Native Artwork

Alaskan Souvenirs - Frank Kovalchek via Flickr
Photo credit: Frank Kovalchek via Flickr

Among handmade Alaskan souvenirs, you could also look for one that is more overtly representative of Alaska – Alaska Native Artwork is a great option, and it’s such a varied category of souvenirs that you can surely find something you like.

You can find sculptures, carvings, and wall art made by local artists from a variety of indigenous groups. My personal favorite is the style of iconography used by the Haida people.

9. Alaskan Photography

Alaska Photograph - Steve Traudt via Etsy
Photo © Steve Traudt via Etsy

The above photo, taken by photographer Steve Traudt, is a great example of the kind of stunning Alaskan photography you can bring home as one of the best Alaskan souvenirs.

While I don’t have any of Steve’s work on my walls, I do have a tryptic of aurora photos taken by a photographer who sells his matted prints at the Anchorage Market. There are plenty of galleries across the state where you can find prints too, if you’re in the market to splurge on an artistic centerpiece.

10. Jade Jewelry

Jade is the Alaska state gemstone, so it’s an ideal stone to seek out if you want to bring home a nice piece of jewelry as your Alaskan souvenir. You can find jade jewelry in almost all of the jewelry stores and souvenir shops, but it can help to ask about the artist or jewelry-maker to ensure you’re getting local stones from a local artist*.

*Alaska jade differs from Chinese jade in its mineral composition, so if you’re in a jewelry store, you should be able to ask the jeweler to confirm it’s local.

11. Fur Products

Souvenirs from Alaska - Gillfoto via Flickr
Photo credit: Gillfoto via Flickr

I love animals as much as the next person, but I also recognize how pivotal animal furs and pelts have been to the indigenous people in Alaska. Therefore, if you’re okay with animal furs for that reason (or any reason) this is a great splurge-worthy souvenir.

There are some great shops that sell furs in Anchorage, or if you visit during the winter you can time your trip for Fur Rendezvous. This annual event commemorates the historic event where all the fur trappers brought their pelts in to trade and get supplies; today it’s a cultural event and marks the beginning of the Iditarod dog-sledding race. If you visit at any point throughout the winter, don’t be surprised to see locals wearing fur to stay warm.

Like I said, fur is a part of life in Alaska.

12. Moose Nugget Gifts

Moose Nugget Ornaments - Once in a Blue Moose
Photo © Once in a Blue Moose

Okay, I’ll admit: it took a while to find a good photo of the funky different moose nugget (aka moose poop) gifts you can find in Alaska. Some of these are made with real moose poop; others are made of chocolate or baked goods to look like moose poop.

If you’re looking for a truly funky souvenir or gift for friends back in the Lower 48, look for:

  • “Lip Chap,” a chapstick you definitely won’t use.
  • Chocolates or Truffles
  • Earrings, for the woman who has everything else!
  • Ornaments, like those pictured above

And if you’re visiting Alaska in the winter, you can seek out this moose nugget hot chocolate to stay warm.

13. Anything ‘Made in Alaska’ or ‘Alaska Grown’

This one isn’t a specific souvenir, but rather a tip: if you see one of the above logos, that means you’re in the right ballpark for purchasing a great Alaskan souvenir. These two logos indicate that the item you’re looking at was made or grown in the Last Frontier.

Some of my favorite souvenirs from Alaska over the years have been emblazoned with the Alaska Grown logo – I still have one of their stickers on my Nalgene from when I grew up in Alaska. (I’m Alaska grown too!)

Which of these best Alaskan souvenirs will you be bringing home from your Alaska trip? Let me know in the comments!

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